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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
countries such as india and indonesia are likely to boost their military power. but they warn of an arms race in asia. if the u.s. scales back its military commitment in the region. they say some tionmay begin developing nuclear weapons. new car sales are fueling china's economy. sales grew 8.2% in november from the same time last year. officials say nearly 1.8 million units were sold last month. japanese firms lost out after chinese consumers boytted their vehicles over a territorial dispute. they saw a slight improvement last month. total new car sales this china were sluggish in september as japanese cars fell out of favorite. sales have been growing for two straight months since october. >>> the leaders of iraq say they are ready to make their coury a mayor player in the global oil market. they will double and quadruple oil output. businesses from arrange the world are eyeing with fresh interest. >> reporter: it holds some of the world's largest untapped reserves. basri has hosted a four day trade show. the oil market is called by some take holder as the last frontier. this exhibitio
collapsed but rather than the eight geography is in its preciousness as now you have people in indonesia that care about what they did interrupting the flotilla and you have crawled in bangladesh and i'm sure tomorrow we may see in malaysia and indonesia and elsewhere enraged about the movie a was made in california but while rage can spread around the world, it is a starting point. once you start to analyze what is likely to happen in egypt next and in syria you get different scenarios based on the legacy of geography. geography shows libya was in the country but a geographical expression with triple the oriented than tunisia or alexandria and egypt so it can only be governed through the totalitarian means and once that collapses though we have an elected government in tripoli it cannot project power beyond a greater aaa lisieux you have a problem with governor allin capacity and lydia that cannot deal with the crisis in egypt it's different. in egypt you have a country that has been an age-old cluster of civilization for thousands of years, a cohesive community beyond the normal where
, places like pakistan and indonesia and so on. but also through christians she has met who have a direct experience with this. this story is also powerfully documented. one further point, general point i wanted to make about this book, to raise a general question, to whom is this book addressed and who might benefit from it? many people, and i think it's a very suitable gift for the holidays -- [laughter] i hope people will go out and buy it. it's a very informative and moving book and it's very unique because lela is a very good writer. i would say that there are several appropriate lines. first writing as a christian american, it is natural that one of her audience the christian americans are at least other non-jewish americans. and since it's you know, it describes a good deal of what jewish life is like in israel and left me say about this, she is markedly well-informed, testament to our own curiosity in the hospitality she found by the israelis. i should say perhaps there are a number of aspects of israeli life even specifically jewish experiences which may be largely unknown to ame
they can make extraordinary strides for the assistance from others. let me cite one example. indonesia, perhaps my favorite example, there the government has dedicated itself to creating the civilian legal structure in law enforcement institutions to fight terrorism effectively, comprehensively, and using the rule of law. in disease has scored more than 100 conservative convictions in terrorist cases and the national police has major successes in breaking up terrorist cells linked to other violent extremists ors and anyone who thinks back eight or nine years or even a decade will remember that many of sauce it athe time indonesia hung in the balance and unlikely to survive. nobody thinks that now. any discussion of the ct landscape of southeast asia is frequently omitted. the play here is the capacity building can work and we must count to innovate. to improve our advocacy. i said at the outset that at the beginning of the administration, we were determined to did a better job of countering violent extremism. let me tell you about our efforts to legitimize the terrorist narrative. unde
from others. but me cite one example. indonesia, perhaps my favorite example. if the government has dedicated itself to creating civilian legal structures and law enforcement institutions to fight terrorism effect in late, comprehensively and within the rule of law. indonesia has scored more than 100 consecutive convictions in terrorist cases for national places had major successes in breaking up terrorist future muslim yet another violent extremists organizations. anyone who thinks back eight or nine years for a decade will remember many of us thought at the time and did misha hung in the balance and was unlikely to survive his bout with extremism. no one thinks that now had any discussion of the landscape in southeast asia is frequently admitted. the point here is capacity building can work it must continue innovate to prove efficacy. it said at the outset that the beginning of the administration were determined to better java countering violent extremism. so then they tell you of our efforts to delegitimize the terrorist narrative. undersecretary clinton's leadership established
including the largest, indonesia, in which the muslims participate in the democracy and you have the political parties within that system, so i think when we have discussions especially these days given the turmoil in the middle east we are very focused on the 20% of the muslim world and six and ten of the muslims live in the pacific region and we need to keep their experiences in mind and think about the death of their experiences, but the main point which i think we all agree on is there is nothing and it is anti-democratic about islam in terms of political culture and needing more than christianity or judea's some so we agree on that point. second, and this is where we disagree. given the middle east which i think we are going to focus on today, the crushing social democratic economic political pressures in the societies are facing a change is coming and i've lived in this part of the world for five years back in 1990 and i go back regularly and support the notion as it is crafted in part because i think it is like debating how gravity. you see the early results in some, not m
with india and indonesia. not really new but integrating partnerships but our partnership with china is critical. as we look at both opportunities to build on cooperation and franken opportunity compete economically and then to avoid any prospect in light of conflict. so those are a critical element. as we think about international institutions including both regional and more broad international institutions, those are a key part of that as well. to us, the other two pieces i'm going to put in our presence. with 60 years of history where the united states has provided a stabilizing role toward economic development, and the fact that most of international trade floats, as the apple noted, is a key part of that. and with a strong interest, not just the asia-pacific region by the international community does. so as we continue to sustain and enhance our presence through a stabilizing function and fun at the end of the day when you have the capacity as a u.s. military to have policy as well. that's a global capability. but that means that they respected the choices that are made by othe
pluralistic will be forced to rescind this in indonesia. in 2002, the largest muslim country got about 41% of the vote. not a majority, but they declined over the last couple of years to 29%. need to keep what are examples of when we talk about what's coming ahead in the middle east because i believe we are in the early stages of transformation and we'll talk about the complex power. a final point i hope we debate a little bit people certainly talk later today. the history of u.s. policy. it's an idea that two years this transition and i would call it arab awakening or arab spring. it's too early to characterize. we've only seen for country see their leadership change. it's very, very early. but the u.s. at this stage, the debate talks about how we actually adapt and become more nimble to these events. both in terms of how we deal with political islam and all other act or spirit we need to figure out how to judiciously engage support to a key factor, which are talked about here are not islamist forces. if you look at the most recent election results, there's a desire and hunger for divers
nation located strategically between the united states territory of guam, the philippines and indonesia. captured in world war ii, palau became part of the u.s. administered trust territory of the pacific islands. in 1994 it became part of an association which grants the u.s. military rights that the department of state calls -- quote -- "vital to our national security." the compact also provided palau with an initial 15-year assistance and that ended in 2009. the agreement would extend and phase out u.s. assistance by 2024. congress has provided stopgap funding since 2009, but the department of defense wrote to our committee, the committee on energy and natural resources in april of 2011, stating -- quote -- "failure to follow through on our commitments to palau as reflected in the proposed agreement would jeopardize our defense posture in the western pacific." the agreement provides for the phaseout of financial assistance for operation, construction and maintenance. the congressional budget office's ten-year budget estimate for direct spending is $171 million. the u.s. commitment to
it was more than that. here i was a young boy with a white mom, a black father, raised in indonesia and hawaii and i was beginning to sense how fitting into the world might not be as simple as it might seem. and so to see this man, this senator, this powerful, accomplished person, who was not a central casting when it what you think a senator might look like at the time. and the way he commanded the respect of an entire nation, i think it hinted to me what might be possible in my own life. this was a man who, as a teenager, stepped up to serve his country even after his fellow japanese-americans were declared enemy aliens. a man who beliefed in america even when its government didn't necessarily believe in him. that meant something to me. it gave me a pow powerful sense, one that i couldn't put into words, a powerful sense of hope. and as i watched those hearings listening to danny ask those piercing questions night after night i learned something else. i learned how our democracy was supposed to work. our government of and by and for the people. that we had a system of government where nobody
father, raised in indonesia and hawaii. i was beginning to sense how fitting into the world might not be as simple as it might seem. and so, to see this man, this center, this powerful an accomplished person, when it came to what you think the senator might look like at the time, the way that he commanded the respect of the entire nation, it hinted to me what might be possible for my own life. this was a man that stepped up to serve his country even after his fellow japanese americans were declared enemy aliens. a man that believed in america even when its government did not necessarily believe in him. that meant something to me. it gave me a powerful sense, one that i could not put into words. as i watched the hearings, listening to his piercing questions night after night, i learned how a democracy was supposed to work. a government of, by, and for the people. nobody is above the law. we have an obligation to hold each other countable. these things that we stand for, the ideals that we hold dear, they are bigger than any one person, party, or politician. nobody communicated that
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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